FAQs

  • 1.  Why do we have to pay a fee for Drivers Education?

    The fees are assessed to cover the difference in what the state provides for the program and the actual cost, (click on the question for additional information.)

     

    State statute allows school systems to charge up to $65.00 per student to cover costs that are above the funding provided by the State. 

    For the 2015 - 2016 school year, the actual cost to provide Drivers Education classes is $250.00 per student, (30 hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours behind the wheel).  The State has provided funding at a rate of $163.00 per 9th grade student.  Because of the significant difference, the school system had to establish a fee to offset the costs associated with the program.

     

     

    2.  When do the fees have to be paid?

    The $50.00 fee will be collected by the instructor on the first day of the class.

     

    3.  If the student drops out of the class, will they receive a refund?

    The fee and registration reserves the spot for the student. If a student drops out of the class and/or can not complete the class for other reasons then the space can not be filled with another student. For that reason, once a fee is paid, it is important for the student to complete the class the first time. Refunds will not be available once the class has started.

     

    •  Drivers Eligibility Certificates  (6 Questions)

    1.  What is a Driving Eligibility Certificate?

     

    A Driving Eligibility Certificate is used to verify that a student is meeting academic and enrollment expectations for the state of North Carolina and therefore in combination with the other requirements outlined in § 20-11 (d) (1), (2), and (3) may obtain either a limited driver's learner permit or a provisional (limited or full) driver's license.

     

     

    2.  How long is a Driving Eligibility Certificate valid?

     

    The Driving Eligibility Certificate is valid for 30 days, § 20-11 (n)(3) once it has been issued.

     

     

    3.  How does a minor enrolled in a private/home school within NC obtain a Driving Eligibility Certificate?

     

    The Division of Non-Public Education at www.ncdnpe.org lists directions on obtaining a Driving Eligibility Certificate. Please note, home schools must be registered with the Division of Non-Public Education for 6 months in order to obtain a Driving Eligibility Certificate. For more details please call the Division of Non-Public Education directly at: 919.733.4276.

     

     

    4.  How does someone under 18 residing in NC but not attending school obtain a Driving Eligibility Certificate?

     

    In North Carolina, prior to age 18, everyone must show adequate progress toward a high school diploma, a high school diploma, or its equivalent in order to obtain a driver's license. (§ 20-11)

     

     

     

    5.  What constitutes a hardship request to receive a Driving Eligibility Certificate?

     

    The school principal or principal's designee may determine specific circumstances exist that constitute a hardship thereby allowing a student to receive a Driving Eligibility Certificate. A hardship is defined as "a demonstrable burden on the student or the student's family…" 16 NCAC 06E.0301 (c) (3)

     

     

    6.  Why would a Driving Eligibility Certificate be revoked?

     

    There are three reasons why a Driver Eligibility Certificate could be revoked.

    • DROPPING OUT OF SCHOOL PRIOR TO AGE 18
      As of August 1, 1998 any public, private, federal, home-schooled, or community college student under age 18 who does not make adequate academic progress or drops out of school will have their driving permit or provisional license revoked. (§ 20-11) 

      Under the Dropout Prevention Guidelines, a dropout student is one who has withdrawn from school before the end of the academic term and whose enrollment in an educational setting cannot be verified for 30 days. Parents should be notified in writing that the student's Driver Eligibility Certificate will be revoked. Parents may submit a hardship request to the principal or principal's designee to maintain the student's Driving Eligibility status. 

    • DISCIPLINARY ACTION
      Disciplinary action includes an expulsion, a suspension for more than 10 consecutive days, or an assignment to an alternative educational setting for more than 10 consecutive days. (§ 20-11(n1))

      Under the Lose Control/Lose License guidelines, the Driving Eligibility Certificate is revoked for one year. Unlike the Dropout Prevention guidelines that end when a student turns age 18, the revocation of a Driving Eligibility Certificate for disciplinary action can extend beyond age 18 if the disciplinary action took place during the time the student was age 17. 

    • NOT MAKING ADEQUATE ACADEMIC PROGRESS
      At the end of each semester, students not passing 70% of the maximum possible courses are identified. Parents are notified that the student is not making adequate academic progress and have the option of submitting a hardship request to the principal or principal's designee to maintain the student's Driving Eligibility status.
     

     

    •  Dropout Prevention, Driver's License Legislation/Lose Control, Lose Your License Legislation  (4 Questions)

    1.  How does Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License Legislation work?

     

    North Carolina House Bill 769 became effective December 1, 1997 and reflects a coordinated statewide effort to motivate and encourage students to complete high school. This legislation requires that a student's driving permit or license be revoked if a student is unable to maintain adequate progress or drops out of school. Adequate progress is defined as passing 70% of all courses and is determined by first semester grades and second semester grades for schools on block scheduling. For schools on a traditional six-period day schedule, grades are determined by first semester grades and end-of-year grades.

    In rare cases, there may be circumstances beyond the control of the student or his/her parents that qualify as a hardship. If a hardship exists, the student may request a waiver. If the waiver is granted, the student would not be affected by the legislation. Hardship cases are rare and are reserved for extreme situations. 

     

     

    2.  What are the major aspects of Lose Control, Lose Your License Legislation?

     

    North Carolina Senate Bill 57, which became effective July 1, 2000, requires that a student's driving permit or license be revoked for one year if a student is given a suspension for more than 10 consecutive days or an assignment to an alternative educational setting for more than 10 consecutive days for one of the following reasons:

    1. The possession or sale of an alcoholic beverage or an illegal controlled substance on school property.
    2. The possession or use on school property of a weapon or firearm that resulted in disciplinary action under G.S. 115C-391 (d1) or that could have resulted in that disciplinary action if the conduct had occurred in a public school.
    3. The physical assault on a teacher or other school personnel on school property.

    School property is the physical premises of the school, school buses, or other vehicles under the school's control or contract and that are used to transport students, and school-sponsored or school-related activities that occur on or off the physical premises of the school. Students who are at least 14 years old or who were rising 8th graders on or after July 1, 2000, are subject to this law. Students who were issued a NC driver's permit or license before December 1, 1997, or students who are 18 years old cannot be charged under this law.

    Unlike the "Dropout Prevention/Driver's License" law that only affects students under the age of 18, the "Lose Control" law does not stop at age 18. It is possible for a student to have his or her license suspended as a 17-and-a-half-year-old and not be eligible to drive for a full calendar year, reaching 18-and-a-half before again being eligible to drive.
     

     

    3.  Whom do the laws affect?

     

    Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License Legislation: The legislation is directed to all North Carolina students under the age of 18 who are eligible for a driving permit or license. This includes public schools, federal schools, home schools, private schools, and community college students.

    Lose Control Lose Your License law: The law affects students who are at least 14 years old or who are rising 8th graders on or after July 1, 2000. Students who are 18 years old cannot be charged under this law; however, the year’s suspension can go beyond a student’s 18th birthday.

     

     

    4.  What state agencies are involved in the Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License Legislation and the Lose Control Lose Your License law?

     

    The laws specifically identify several state agencies to work collaboratively in the implementation of the law. The Department of Public Instruction, Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Non-Public Schools, and Community College System are partners in this effort.

     

     

    •  Practice NC Permit Tests  (1 Questions)

    1.  Are there DMV practice tests available?

     

    Before you go into DMV to take your knowledge test, practice taking one (or all) of the available sample tests.

    When you are ready to take the actual test, keep these suggestions in mind:

    • Review the NC Driver's Handbook. It contains a lot of information and it may take you a few days to get through it.
    • Read the test questions carefully. Don't read anything extra into the question. There will be one correct answer and the other answer choices will be either obviously wrong or not appropriate for the question asked.
    • Remember, all the test questions are taken from the handbook.
    • Don't be nervous. DMV wants you to pass your test. Good Luck!

     FREE NC DMV practice permit test